2 pages a week...

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2 pages a week...

Postby bluetoaster on Fri May 18, 2007 3:07 pm

2 pages a week.
Sounds like a diet doesn't it?

It's easy to be complaisant (particularly when most of us work/study full time) - but I just realised that if I really wanted to publish a 'quarterly' comic (ie. every 3 months), then I would have to do 2 pages a week.

2 pages A WEEK.

(Makes you think doesn't it?).....

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Postby tonia on Fri May 18, 2007 4:46 pm

Probably depneds on how long a page takes you really... that'd be a snap for some and a big chore for others.
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Postby jpaulos on Mon May 21, 2007 9:54 am

Forget deadlines ... just make good comics. Crumb puts out one comic every five years and I always buy it.
Your stuff is beautiful how it is, I'd hate to see your work suffer and YOU suffer a nervous breakdown for what?
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Postby bluetoaster on Mon May 21, 2007 10:54 am

jpaulos wrote:Forget deadlines ... just make good comics. Crumb puts out one comic every five years and I always buy it.
Your stuff is beautiful how it is, I'd hate to see your work suffer and YOU suffer a nervous breakdown for what?

Lol...
I'm suffering a nervous breakdown from not being productive.
The longer I go without producing work - the more anxious I feel.

But I know what you mean Jase.
I definitely won't publish anything I feel is 'churned' out, simply for the sake of a deadline.

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Postby davidjcunning on Wed May 23, 2007 8:38 am

I'm suffering a nervous breakdown from not being productive.
The longer I go without producing work - the more anxious I feel.


I'm absolutely the same B. If I'm not drawing every other night I start to worry about slowing down too much.
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ROUTINE...

Postby bluetoaster on Wed May 23, 2007 10:37 am

If you get past that initial first week-or-so of getting on your routine - then it's like a diet/gym. If you slack off for more than a day-or-two... you get anxious. Which isn't a bad thing (in terms of productivity) I think.

I've found the routine of doing 'X' number of pages a week (or whatever you set yourself) - is a good motivator NOT to slack off, once you've gained momentum. Granted, I undertand Jason's thoughts on the matter about just doing good comics and enjoying the process, but I can't seem to enjoy it if I'm unproductive.

If I don't stick to a routine, it feels like I'm masturbating, rather than trying to have a child.

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Postby jpaulos on Wed May 23, 2007 10:50 am

OK, keep us updated with your process ... more work from you can never be a bad thing!
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Postby matt g on Wed May 23, 2007 12:04 pm

It's always good to bear in mind that with print on demand - essentially eternal print runs and The Long Tail effect, investing more time to produce a better product to the detriment of fast deadlines is probably going to be better in the long term for you as a producer, in terms of fan and peer respect, and subsequently sales.

Cheers,
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Postby bluetoaster on Wed May 23, 2007 1:38 pm

matt g wrote:It's always good to bear in mind that with print on demand - essentially eternal print runs and The Long Tail effect, investing more time to produce a better product to the detriment of fast deadlines is probably going to be better in the long term for you as a producer, in terms of fan and peer respect, and subsequently sales.

Respectfully, I'd disagree.

If you drop off the radar screen for a long time (in terms of work published) - then you'll constantly have to be "refreshing people's memory" of you when you finally bring something out, rather than just being 'known' through your consistent publishing efforts. Sure crumb has success bringing out a book every 5 years - but his volume of work in his earlier life (which is being constantly published, and earns him money) affords him the luxury of doing a comic whenever he feels like it. We should all be so lucky.

As a creator, sure there's a benefit in taking a relaxed approach & just doing stuff whenever you feel like it. If you can't enjoy comics any other way - then by all means, do it that way.

Anyway... to each their own methods.

I'm not saying my notions are correct. I'm just saying that you'll get the rewards you deserve by the work that you put in. Whatever that may be.

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Postby BMB on Wed May 23, 2007 2:15 pm

For me personally putting 'Updated twice a week' on the front page of my webcomic was the best thing I ever did. A couple of times its forced me to get off the couch/PC chair and in front of the drawing board, and although the first 10 minutes feel like a grind, soon my juices start flowing and I'm drawing away with my tongue poking out and around (Much to the merriment of anyone thats see's me..... :p )

I'm also glad as I feel (imo) I've progressed more in the last year than the 5 before it, simply because of the increased volume.

But I also agree that you should be having fun, which is why I don't have fixed days of the week to update....giving me some flexibility, because real life has a way of intruding on my bubble. :D
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Postby bluetoaster on Wed May 23, 2007 3:41 pm

BMB wrote:...A couple of times its forced me to get off the couch/PC chair and in front of the drawing board, and although the first 10 minutes feel like a grind, soon my juices start flowing and I'm drawing away...

This is a peculiar fact that is shared by many (if not most), and certainly by me. There is this resisting force that makes sitting down in your drawing chair analogous to sitting in a dentist's chair. It's like you have an aweful friend who's constantly sabotaging your efforts by playing with your mind . But once you sit down & just relax & start working - within 5 minutes your on a roll & loving it.

After those first 5 minutes, you notice that unwelcomed 'bad' friend has gone - and your thankfull.
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Postby jpaulos on Wed May 23, 2007 3:46 pm

My experience from attempting a regular series (Hairbutt) was that working harder didn't affect my sales and if anything it had the opposite effect. The result of a several years of this (working after office hours) was a bad back and a bunch of comics I couldn't sell.
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Postby bluetoaster on Wed May 23, 2007 3:56 pm

jpaulos wrote:My experience from attempting a regular series (Hairbutt) was that working harder didn't affect my sales and if anything it had the opposite effect. The result of a several years of this (working after office hours) was a bad back and a bunch of comics I couldn't sell.

Great pep-talk Jase. - lol.
That'll motivate us.

I give the same advice about women. "All they get you is a bad back."
I know where your comin' from Jase.

:)

In all seriousness though, I can respect anyone's decision to work in their own manner. I'm sure no-one could talk you out of your 'Hairbutt' days at the time Jase. Maybe I'll end up regretting this in the future too, only time will tell... but I know for certain that I will regret it if I don't give it a good shot now while I have the inclination to do so.

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Postby jpaulos on Thu May 24, 2007 8:53 am

Then what are you wasting time for? (Cracks whip)

Only kidding ...

I'm not doubting you, I'm just speaking from my own own experience ... people can take it or leave it. I don't see myself as a role model BTW ... I'm just like you guys. I don't regret slogging my guts out (I'm still doing it), I just regret not going to the gym once in a while!
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Postby Ian T on Fri May 25, 2007 3:02 pm

Bobby, I understand your anxiety when not producing artwork - I totally agree.

I'm enjoying the routine of producing 13 x 4 page episodes a year of Moth & Tanuki, but it's a hard momentum to maintain, given that I work full-time and have many children :). That's at least a colour page a week, but I've been doing some extra stuff as well.

The discipline of actually sitting down at my drawing desk is invaluable - just getting into that space, no matter how tired or distracted, or whatever, does something and I start drawing. Sometimes it can take a few minutes, but the key is to get there and be determined to stay, at least for a while.

I also have times that I reserve for scripting, including one each week where I'm sitting waiting in the car. It starts with me thinking that I won't be able to get anything together, but just getting into that habitual, undistracted space enacts a certain magic.

Cheers,

Ian T.
(it's not like there's anything on TV worth watching anyway)
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